PDF Susan Tarr Æ Æ Seacliff, a Regular Boy Within eBook ´ Seacliff, a

When his mother died Malcolm at six years old became one of the ‘lost’ children of that time those forgotten or abandoned by their families His young life was spent in the SEACLIFF MENTAL HOSPITAL situated north of Dunedin where he grew up mirroring many of the mannerisms of the other hospital children All the while he knew that he was different from them Malcolm’s story is one of immeasurable sadness when considering the tragedy and abuse of his wasted earlier life and yet with an admirable strength courage and innate resilience he ultimately rose above it all and was able to free the ‘regular boy within’ as he had always wanted


10 thoughts on “Seacliff, a Regular Boy Within

  1. says:

    EDIT This book has been published in the USA under the title PHENOMENA the Lost and Forgotten Children Publishing date 2014 January 19Malcolm lost everything in life when his mom died and his dad abandoned him at the train station As trauma after trauma manifested in this young boy's life his brain closed off the section when his memories became too much to handle As a result he became uiet and eventually stop speaking altogether He had to endure terrible odds to survive but had the presence of mind to know what was actually happening with and around him He was admitted to the Seacliff Asylum which later would be named Seacliff Mental Hospital It was also known as the Loony Bin or Booby Hatch where Malcolm gleaned that mad people shouldn’t speak It only caused trouble and work They should sit and be uiet uietly mad They lived in a world full of silent people in The Building – that’s what the hospital was calledHe suffered and witnessed the aftermath of experimental treatments including the embarrassing concept of Eugenics on people and at one point decided to take control of his own destiny by hiding his medicines in his pocket seams and not drinking it in the hope of improving his memory which were constantly destroyed by The Treatment With all The Treatments they had to endure through the years and all the medicines fed to them to calm them all down the 'inmates' lost their mind altogether A little voice in him encouraged him to fight back his own silent way Seacliff Lunatic Asylum The book is not only a commemoration of the historical building Seacliff Lunatic Asylum in New Zealand but also a detailed description of the lives and characters who graced it with their presence as either the 'rejects' of society or the staff who worked there for many years The characters are so endearing I almost felt like going to them and say I am so sorry society treated you this way The story winds through the historical facts with ease and a gripping tale is introduced to the reader The tale is very well written This book reminds me of the movie One flew over the Cuckoo's nest which also had me laughing and crying Eventually Malcolm's spirit would triumph and in his case it became a celebration after confirmation of hope which never died Hope is a good thing maybe the best of things and no good thing ever dies Movie uote from The Shawshank Redemption 1994 Andy Defresne Tim RobbinsWhat an amazing story


  2. says:

    The first thing which comes into my mind regarding Susan Tarr’s book is that I’ve never read something like it It’s not an average prototype of fiction with its usual genres and formulas It’s the uniue story – inspired by true people and facts – of a little boy’s terrible experience of growing in a mental hospital Unlike the other patients there Malcom had never fit in and struggled to keep his normality in a heart and mind wrenching environment The story has a depth that could only come from life experience from knowledge of the human psychology and behavior Although the first part is sad and introduces shocking and depressing aspects of the treatments and life imposed to mental hospitals’ patients the author skillfully manages to sprinkle some humor in the darkest situations The ending is unexpected with a twist that makes the reader think it was all worth it and start reading it again A great book from a great author


  3. says:

    I love this book I loved researching it I loved interviewing older people for it And I loved writing it Having worked in various mental hospitals for many years along with most of my family we had a wealth of knowledge to share about what most probably did happenWhere this novel differs is in the humour Because it is such dark subject matter I felt strongly that there had to be some levity in it You simply had to have a lot of stuff to break that up because nobody wants to read something that’s just desperately miserable


  4. says:

    I enjoyed this book very much mainly because I personally know how accurate it is regarding many details of the life in a mental hospital The books is very introspective but far from depressing and as the cover artfully suggests reveals some of the puzzle pieces of that marvelous labyrinth the human mind All the feelings thoughts facts are put into words skilfully finding the perfect balance between simple and complex fiction and reality Readers of any level could enjoy it just the simple surface story or the depth that lies underneath itI would recommend this book to all those who like reading no matter what genre because there's much to learn from it than from a psychological anthology


  5. says:

    This book is amazing; it is honestly different As the author says she's put true stories into a fictionalised format the result is a highly readable description of a slice of life few people were privy to the 'bin' the mental hospital the 'asylum' But interwoven into the historical descriptions a few actually funny unbearably sad is the story of Malcolm What happens to a child who has had no parenting? A child who is exposed to institutionalisation? A child whose stimulation is all wrong? A child who is not allowed to grow up? Read Seacliff A Regular Boy Within and many of these uestions are answered Don't come with any preconceptions


  6. says:

    Phenomena the Lost and Forgotten Children is the new title now published in the USA of 'Seacliff a Regular Boy Within' published originally in New Zealand which I reviewed some time ago This is what I saidThis book is amazing; it is honestly different As the author says she's put true stories into a fictionalised format the result is a highly readable description of a slice of life few people were privy to the 'bin' the mental hospital the 'asylum' But interwoven into the historical descriptions a few actually funny unbearably sad is the story of Malcolm What happens to a child who has had no parenting? A child who is exposed to institutionalisation? A child whose stimulation is all wrong? A child who is not allowed to grow up? Read ‘Phenomena The Lost and Forgotten Children’ and many of these uestions are answered Don't come with any preconceptions


  7. says:

    Fascinating for me because I can visualise so many of the places mentioned Sad picture of the lives of the mentally ill or simply difficult people who were shuffled out of sight behind Seacliff's walls


  8. says:

    Lying sick in bed I finished this book in a few hours This should tell you two things about the book It was i engaging and ii an easy read The book exposes institutionalisation in a very subtle way Short sentences Fleeting thoughts of a mentally challenged person Disconnection interspersed with meaning It gave me goosebumps not because I have never heard or read about institutionalisation and the stigmatisation of mentally ill No not at all Instead it was reading the book and then identifying all the anecdotal stories that I still hear from people in the media and newspapers Suffice to say my attic of memories was in chaos This book is a reminder that we still have a long fight ahead of usAs Dumbledore says“There will be a time when we must choose between what is easy and what is right”


  9. says:

    This book is set in New Zealand though the story it tells might well have occurred in many other countries Through no fault of his own Malcolm is put into a mental institution where he spends his most formative years – from small child to middle age The reader can not remain unmoved by his situation yet the skill of the Author means one isn’t overcome by thoughts of blame and recrimination – rather the story that is revealed is one of humanity throughout In the end it is not so much the horrors inflicted on Malcolm that remain in one’s mind but admiration for the character who endured and against the odds managed to emerge from a seemingly inescapable situationWell worth reading


  10. says:

    I love this book I loved researching it I loved interviewing older people for it And I loved writing it Having worked in various mental hospitals for many years along with most of my family we had a wealth of knowledge to share about what most probably did happenWhere this novel differs is in the humour Because it is such dark subject matter I felt strongly that there had to be some levity in it You simply had to have a lot of stuff to break that up because nobody wants to read something that’s just desperately miserable